65 Days of Static - One Time for All Time

"As you can see, there's a lot going on in this nervous, angry, very atmospheric music. This LP does conjour up windswept mud flats and big constantly changing skies (well, they are from Hull). "


 


65 Days of Static – One Time for All Time


 


I'm not going to attempt a normal length review with this release. It can be summed up quite quickly actually, something regular readers will know isn't really Incendiary's style as we like our long-winded eulogies here. However this time we're going to have to accept defeat, despite the fact that I really, really like this LP and desperately wanted to write a monster review for this debut.


 


The reason for this is that the music basically reinforces the same idea through 10 closely related tracks. When I say closely related I mean that it all sounds pretty similar; all are instrumentals, all chop and change with dazzling speed (in that way this release is incredibly reminiscent of both D.J. Shadow's Endtroducing and very early Krautrock releases such as Can's Monster Movie and Tangerine Dream's Electronic Meditation) and all eschew a fairly menacing, brooding, "made in the North of England" air.


 


I made a shed-full of notes whilst trying to piece together a reaction to this release. Here are two snippets, which hopefully give a flavour of the music and its effect on this reviewer.


 


"Again there's a slow organic build-up. Obviously 65 Days' trick is to work towards a moment where a momentary harmony between the instruments is reached (satisfying the listener in the process) only to then cruelly deny it, often by violent, unpredictable means."


 


"Just as a conclusion seems to be reached, the music shatters and carries on shattering, incessantly. I suppose it is akin to climbing a hill, only to suddenly slip down a scree slope, then to begin the ascent again."


 


As you can see, there's a lot going on in this nervous, angry, very atmospheric music. This LP does conjour up windswept mud flats and big constantly changing skies (well, they are from Hull). It has that dour belligerence that New Order's Low Life had about it too, as well as a Northern worthiness not heard since the mid-eighties.


 


What I'm trying to say is that it could be off-putting kids, especially if you're looking for a good time. But, what the heck, who cares? I think this is a marvelous record, even if I can't describe it adequately. Perfect for the late winter and early spring months. A record that's full of bluster fury and unexpected beauty. Actually great dance music if you give it a try.


 


Words: Richard Foster.


 


www.65daysofstatic.com