Inca Ore with Lemon Bear's Orchestra - The Birds in the Bushes.

As my father said when he was unwittingly (certainly unwillingly) exposed to the track Spine Milk, “it sounds like they had all their instruments pinched and went to the kitchen”

 

Inca Ore with Lemon Bear's Orchestra – The Birds in the Bushes.

http://www.5rc.com/

 

The story reads thus; singer Inca Ore locks herself up in a spooky old wooden house with a gentleman who specialises in found sounds; Lemon Bear. Let's try to describe it. Actually we've been given some help because on the front of my CD there's a little sticker which says,

 

"Belief pacts, beatnik poetry, sandpipers and perfumes, axed lungs, prison lullabies, pigmented moments, bonneted lambs, January storm fang, I'm listening illuminate with your imagination".

 

Quite.

 

See, the thing is, this random verbiage is a pretty accurate description of the music. From the opening track, The Garden of the Awakening Orich, through the marvellously titled 1950s Beatnik Poetry, right to the last track Forest Feeling, this weird, fractured record never lets up. As my father said when he was unwittingly (certainly unwillingly) exposed to the track Spine Milk, "it sounds like they had all their instruments pinched and went to the kitchen". Indeed.

 

It really depends on what mood you're in, if you don't like people trying to create something artistically valid with found objects then take my earnest advice. Don't listen to this CD. However give it a chance and you'll find yourself enjoying it immensely. It's supremely silly stuff, but obviously carried out with a great deal of conviction. Dada-esque would be a good, if pithy description. For those unacquainted with Dada, maybe I can help in saying that there's a definite nod to Trout Mask Replica and maybe a tip of the hat towards CoCo Rosie (albeit a smashed out of their minds CoCo Rosie). Blue Train being the evidence for the latter observation.

 

Oh, go on, give it a listen, refrain from your immediate urge to switch it off and you could be in for a surprisingly enjoyable experience.

 

Words: Richard Foster.