Miss Anthropy - New Leaves

The fuzzy, gloopy atmosphere is what makes this record: it looks to slowly draw you in, by stealth and then drown your senses with its heavy-lidded sensuality.

 

Inner City Grit  http://www.innercitygritrecords.ithinkmusic.com


Now this is a great LP if you’re in the mood for some candle-lit reflections on a long winter’s evening. Despite the LP’s title, I somehow can’t imagine listening to this record in summer - it should be played in a bedroom or by candlelight- as its self-centred, dreamy vibe can leave the listener in a pleasantly comatose state.
I note that Miss Anthropy’s sound has been compared to Martina Topley Bird and Polly Jean Harvey, and yes, on one level I can see that, (all being women and from Bristol) but what strikes me most is the similarities tracks on this LP have with AR Kane’s 69, that sub-aqueous, slightly psychedelic, womb-like sound, and the preoccupation with the sensual, and intimate side of things.
The fuzzy, gloopy atmosphere is what makes this record: it looks to slowly draw you in, by stealth and then drown your senses with its heavy-lidded sensuality. The arrangements are simple, often soulful and patient. This is a record that takes its time to slowly unwind. For sure, there are some pretty melodies on the record, especially with the bittersweet opener, Pull. But often as with tracks like Green, Safe From Harm and You and Me, the atmosphere drives the music – if that makes sense. That atmosphere is incredibly self-absorbed too the titles are suggestive of this enclosed, bedsit worldview: take My World and Beneath the Sheets as examples.
Anthropy’s voice sometimes takes centre stage, as on My World and Beneath the Sheets. Then you can detect an interest in being a bit of a soul diva (albeit one who is sardonic, and slightly menacing).  Sometimes there is a step up in tempo but on the whole this is a stately beast, slow moving and busy with its own thoughts.
Damned good stuff.