White Hex - Gold Nights

But most noticably, the music has this overwhelmingly soporific quality; listening in can get you in the state of some lounger in the Korova Milk Bar; on your back, in a stupor and unable to react to this insistent smothering.

 

http://www.konkurrent.nl (IT Records)

Before I start I'd better tell you that there's a bit in the melody line on Paradise that sounds like dodgy new age rave pop track, Sweet Harmony by The Beloved. (I digress further; I have the Beloved's Happy Now EP which had a line about kissing flowers; it all made sense in 1986 I suppose). ANYWAY; somehow this melodic coincidence is ok, in that there's a law of opposites working here. Maybe White Hex have come to clean out such impudent associations with peace love & understanding by momentarily aligning themselves with Sweet Harmony; then flushing these dangling remnants of a looser, groovier age away with a good, strong and damned COLD splurge of Cold Wave Bleach. It's all very stern or so it seems, the cover the singer looks on like some prim  governness whilst the lad stands behind pretending to pull that sullen posh boy look. And very Edwardian; remove the cover's white backdrop and we'll see them in their true setting, on some manicured lawn with servants scurrying hither and thither. But for now let's play along with the conceit.
White Hex are out for domination. Their sound is straight forward, tough, determined and not one to broker favours with lesser lights.  And the guitars often play about with that classic Will Sergeant twang (oh if he had a quid for every young shaver who's appropriated his sound since the 80s). But most noticably, White Hex present their music as a political programme. Lay waste to any idea that could be construed as outside the plan. Keep all emotions in check, and apply wave after wave of synth noise.

As such it can be a great listen, a really good pop record; as it's focus means that the songs are kept working for their corn, and because of this, some of them - like Paradise - are really memorable. But most noticably, the music has this overwhelmingly soporific quality; listening in can get you in the state of some lounger in the Korova Milk Bar; on your back, in a stupor and unable to react to this insistent smothering.

I'm not sure, kittens. I mean it really does have its points. Now and again.