The Julie Mittens, Stiff River, Uw Hypotheekadvies - “Blue” EP

Three small cut and paste low-resolution photocopied sheets of paper give minimal information on the bands. We learn only that Uw Hypotheekadvies have "great legs".

 

The Julie Mittens, Stiff River, Uw Hypotheekadvies – "Blue" EP

http://www.wotnxt.com/ uwhypotheekadvies@gmail.com info@juliemittens.nl stiffriver@gmail.com

 

Right, let's get one thing clear. This is a CD showcasing three experimental bands. And what is more, these three bands that can live without song titles. Suffice to say that there are seven tracks, three performed by Stiff River, three by the marvellously named Uw Hypotheekadvies, and one by the Julie Mittens. Casual fans of the Julie Mittens need not take up arms on the subject of them being allocated one track, however. Normally the Julie Mittens only need one song to get their message across.

 

The LP itself is beautifully presented, encased in a fabulous fold-out sleeve, proudly decorated and printed in the Made at Home style. The cover shows off a beautiful drawing of what appears to be (to me at any rate) a mountain landscape. Three small cut and paste low-resolution photocopied sheets of paper give minimal information on the bands. We learn only that Uw Hypotheekadvies have great legs.

 

Let us turn our attention to the music.

 

Stiff River kick off proceedings with a piece of slobbering guitar-based clumping around, very reminiscent in style to UFO era Guru Guru. It is a fabulously deranged opener, the musical equivalent of Jim Royle doing the washing up. Their second track surrenders some of this waywardness, concentrating instead on a cruelly Neanderthal slab of guitar phasing, sonically akin to knocking iron posts into a car park on a bitterly cold day. The slobbery guitar makes a return on track three, belting out - along with the drums - a never-ending tribal rhythm. Goodness...

 

Following that statement of intent, we have three tracks from Uw Hypotheekadvies. First up is a beautiful piece, transgressing from a tentative beginning to a gloriously messy amalgam of off-beat drumming and incessantly garish guitar parts. Track five begins in a similarly scratchy vein to the previous piece, utilizing violin, banjo and some pattering accompaniment. In total contrast, the final track UHA have to offer is a gloriously fuzzy guitar assault; Its the sound of a thousand traffic jams, and I think it's marvellous.

 

What can you say of the Julie Mittens? Well, certainly one thing to say is that they have never (in my experience of them) held back from expressing themselves to the utmost of their capabilities. Their track is a gargantuan, magnificent screech-fest that brings the best exponents of the free-rock genre (Ash Ra Tempel, Boredoms) to mind. Not for the faint hearted.