Ryan Teague - Block Boundaries

And the record is shot through with a quiet, thoughtful take on classic minimalism. Some bits - for example the ghostly Remote Outliers - are very reminiscent of Philip Glass.

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This is a cracker of a record, and we really should have reviewed it earlier, rather than just playing it on repeat since last November. It's one of those really enjoyable LPs that set the tone for a reflective afternoon's dossing about, or amble round the estate. Apparently Teague spent time in Java studying the gamelan, and elements of that Indonesian tradition give Block Boundaries a thoughtful and spiritual feel, as well as a mesmerising abstract quality. Things start perfectly pleasantly with the brisk Site and Situation (something that sounds a bit like Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells) and rapidly progress with the beautiful title track; a patient and very affecting reflection where a piano part carefully picks out a light motif to guide the track.

There's the feeling of an old movie soundtrack to this record (maybe I've got the example of Oldfield's work in The Exorcist in my mind) but there's a musty, 70s feel to the music (especially with tracks like Last Known Position and Scale and Ratio) that puts me in mind of Popol Vuh's quieter excursions, or Edgar Froese's solo stuff. And the record is shot through with a quiet, thoughtful take on classic minimalism. Some bits - for example the ghostly Remote Outliers - are very reminiscent of Philip Glass. Now and again these excursions take on an elegaic feel; Liminal Space in particular benefitting from a beautiful piano refrain. Diversion 2 is also a stately piece, the gloopy synths creating a winsome, almost tragic feel to the music.

This record really is worth a listen, hunt it down.